Enter to win 'Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-first Century' edited by Alice Wong

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Alt text: Giveaway poster featuring book cover of Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-first Century and editor Alice Wong. Photo of an Asian American woman in a power chair. She is wearing a blue shirt with a geometric pattern with orange, black, white, and yellow lines and cubes. She is wearing a mask over her nose attached to a gray tube and bright red lip color. She is smiling at the camera. Photo credit: Eddie Hernandez Photography

I’ve been looking forward to sharing this collection with you all since anthology editor Alice Wong, a San Francisco-based disabled activist, media maker, and Founder and Director of the Disability Visibility Project—an online community dedicated to creating, sharing and amplifying disability media and culture—first reached out to me about her anthology-in-the-works last November. I can’t praise this collection enough and am absolutely elated to announce Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-first Century as our latest Foreign Bodies giveaway pick. We’ll be mailing one lucky subscriber or gift recipient a new copy of the anthology with a note from Alice Wong herself, who, by the way, will casually grace the cover of British Vogue’s September issue along with an army of fellow inspiring activists. Entries for our Disability Visibility giveaway will be accepted through Friday, Aug. 14 at 8 p.m. EST.

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PSA: This giveaway is only open to paying subscribers or comps (gifted subscriptions). If you’re interested in subscribing but haven’t yet—click here!

About the book

From Elizabeth Hee:

Infographic titled “Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century” with a yellow, pink, turquoise, pastel green, and pastel purple color scheme. A green circle next to the title reads “Staying alive is a lot of work for a disabled person in an ableist society.” Another green circle reads “About the editor - Alice Wong” is above a doodle of Alice Wong, an Asian American women in a power chair and a blue shirt with an organize, black, white and yellow geometric pattern, wearing a mask over her nose attached to a gray tube and bright red lip color; and a speech bubble reads “What I have always been opening to accomplish is the creation of community.” Text reads “In high school, Alice read an article in Time about accessible public transit and wrote a letter expressing her wish for it to expand” with a doodle of a hand with a blue pencil and purple nails.” An arrow points to text reading “The letter was published in a subsequent issue - the first time Alice advocated on record as a disabled person, and sparking curiosity for more stories” with a doodle of a Time Magazine cover with a bus with a wheelchair ramp. Another arrow points to text reading “In surrounding herself with these stories, Alice found and developed her own voice. Her collection led her to community” and another arrow points to text reading “In 2014, disabled people through the U.S. were preparing for the following year’s 25th anniversary for the A.D.A” and a doodle of a party hat that reads “Happy 25th Anniversary.” Another arrow points to “Partnering with Storycorps, Alice created the Disability Visibility Project, a way for disabled people to celebrate and preserve their stories” with an image of the cover the “Disability Visibility” book. Another arrow points to “These kinds of stores - the funny, personal moments in disability history - are just as significant as those about leaders and politicians. We need more of these stories.” A curly bracket points to text reading “What started as a small oral history project kept going and blew up into A Movement” with a doodle of a person in a purple wheelchair facing away from the reader and a sign in a cement bucket that reads “Rights for the Disabled - Sign 504 Unchanged!” A sub-header reads “Community is...” Text reads “Political” with a doodle of a ballot box with “#CripTheVote” written on it, “Magic” with a doodle of a blue book with white sparkles and “#CripLit” written on it, “Power” with a doodle of the yellow Disability Visibility podcast logo of Alice Wong, an East Asian woman with purple sunglasses, red headphones, and a mask over her nose attached to a gray tube, and “Resistance” with an image of the cover of “Resistance and Hope: Essays by Disabled People” (a dark blue cover with colorful fungi and the “o” in “Hope” is a moon, with addition text “Crip Wisdom for the people”). Another sub-header reads “Bringing all of these collaborations, connections, and joys to the page.” A blurb of text reads “Just in time for the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong brings together this urgent, galvanizing collection of contemporary essays by disabled people. For Harriet McBryde Johnson’s account of her debate with Peter Singer to original pieces by authors like Keah Brown and Haben Girma; from blog posts, manifestos, and eulogies to congressional testimonies, and beyond: this anthology gives a glimpse into the rich complex city of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites their own understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and the past with hope and love.” A column of text titled “Being” lists contributing authors “Harriet McBryde Johnson, Tallis A. Lewis, Maysoon Zayid, Ariel Henley, Jen Deerinwater, June Eric-Udorie, Jeremy Woody as told to Christie Thompson, Jillian Weise, Liz Moore.” Text reads “When I first read Harriet McBryde Johnson’s ‘Unspeakable Conventions,’ about debating a Princeton prof. who believed people like her should not exist, it shook me to my core - she brilliantly outlined the lived experience of ableism in very real terms. I no longer felt alone in questioning and defending my work.” There is a doodle of Harriet McBryde Johnson, a light-skinned woman with long braid of brown hair, in a wheel chair wearing a red dress and smiling toward the camera. Another column titled “Becoming” lists authors “Ricardo T. Thornton Sr., Sky Cubacub, Haben Girma, Diana Cejas, Sandy Ho, Keah Brown, Keshia Scott, Jessica Slice, Elsa Sjunneson, Zipporah Arielle.” Another column titled “Doing” lists authors “A. H. Reaume, Rebecca Cokley, Alice Sheppard, Wanda Diaz-Merced, Mari Ramsawakh, Shoshana Kessock, Ellen Samuels, Reyna McCoy McDeid, Britney Wilson, Lateef Mcleod.” Text reads “In ‘The Beauty of Spaces Created For and By Disabled People,’ s. e. smith describes the transient alchemy that happens when disabled people come together in the same space - their writing leaves us steeped in the beauty, creativity, and ingenuity of disabled people. There is a doodle of a person with orange hair and purple shirt in a wheelchair on their back with their arms extended, balancing another person on their legs, the second person is in a wheelchair and wears a green shirt with their arms extended. A fourth column titled “Connecting” lists authors “Eugene Grant, Patty Berne as told to and edited by Vanessa Raditz, Harriet Tubman Collective, Karolyn Gehrig, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Jamison Hill, Stacey Milbern, s. e. smith.” A bottom section has text that reads “Plain language summary by Sara Luterman” with a doodle of a piece of paper with blue text and design and a blue pen; text reading “Discussion guide by Naomi Ortiz” with a doodle of two people talking, on with light skin wearing a black bandana and blue shirt, the other with light skin, short brown hair, and glasses wearing purple shirt and holding a green mug; and text reading “Audiobook narrated by Alejandra Ospina” with a doodle of Alejandra, a light-skinned Latina woman with glasses and headphones. Final text in a yellow circle with a doodle of a flower at the top reads “For more about the book: https://disabilityvisibilityproject.com/book”; “Twitter: @SFDireWolf @DisVisiblity”; and “Published by Vintage Books.” On the far right side of the image in small text reads “art by @lizar_tistry.”

“Now, just in time for the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong brings together an urgent, galvanizing collection of personal essays by contemporary disabled writers. From original pieces by up-and-coming authors like Keah Brown and Haben Girma, to blog posts, manifestos, eulogies, testimonies to Congress, and beyond: this anthology gives a glimpse of the vast richness and complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites readers to question their own assumptions and understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and past with hope and love.”

Listen to an audio excerpt

Praise for Disability Visibility

“Alice Wong should be in charge of editing all books. Even better, Alice Wong should be in charge of everything! To Alice, words like ‘diversity’ and ‘intersectionality’ aren’t just buzzwords. They are marching orders. In this book, she has collected a staggering array of stories from writers who experience disability in vastly different ways. This isn’t meant to be THE DEFINITIVE BOOK on disability. It is a doorway, and Alice is inviting us all to go through the doorway and continue our learning process. She even ends the collection with a bibliography that extends far beyond your standard reading list. Whether you currently consider yourself part of the disability community or not, you’re gonna want to take in the wisdom woven throughout this book. Now more than ever, our society desperately needs to listen to and take action on the changes disabled artists and activists have been demanding for so long. I am lucky she is my friend.”
— W. Kamau Bell, host of United Shades of America

Also named to The New York Times’ July New & Noteworthy list, a book to read in honor of the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act by Book Riot, and one of the best books published this summer by the Chicago Tribune.

Enter to win

An upcoming event if you’re interested:

This event invitation is displayed on a light gray background with light blue and yellow doodles. It reads: 'Disability Visibility' Virtual Book Discussion with Alice Wong & Sandy Ho. Saturday, August 8th, 7-8pm EDT. Free event. 5 free copies of the book will be raffled off to attendees. Live CART captioning & ASL interpreting will be provided. Register at Learn.PYD.org. The logo for Partners for Youth with Disabilities is in the top-right corner, which features two cartoon people (one small, one large) with their arms around one another. It also features headshots of Alice Wong and Sandy Ho. Alice is an Asian American woman in a power chair. She is wearing a blue shirt with a geometric pattern with orange, black, white, and yellow lines and cubes. She is wearing a mask over her nose attached to a gray tube and bright red lip color. She is smiling at the camera. Sandy is an Asian American disabled woman with dark wavy shoulder length hair, wearing tortoise shell glasses, a dark blazer and a blue shirt. She is smiling at the camera. 

For when you’re all done…


About Foreign Bodies giveaways

Whenever I read a book I enjoy or one that encourages me to challenge my own beliefs, I’m driven to give everyone around me a sprinkle of the magic. That means you, too. These little surprise giveaways are my special way of thanking you for joining the Foreign Bodies family. I hope the books and collections I send your way make you feel a little more at home, or perhaps inspire you to learn a bit more about the myriad voices out there, voices we don’t get the privilege of hearing as often as we could.

Giveaway rules

Entrants must be paying subscribers or comps (gift recipients) of the Foreign Bodies Newsletter and must have a valid U.S. mailing address. You may only enter once and must use the email address affiliated with your account. Each entry will be assigned a number and winner(s) will be chosen using the Random Integer Generator. Winner(s) will be notified via email and your gift will come personally packaged in the mail.

If you have any additional questions or concerns, please email 4nbodies@gmail.com.

Recommend a book!

Have a favorite immigrant-written book, collection of essays or poetry or what-have-you? Stories that made you feel understood? Stories about immigrant or refugee experiences, about mental illness? Send your recommendationsespecially if it’s your own work. And check out the wealth of books and essays we already have up on foreignbodies.net!

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Fiza